Monday, April 07, 2008

Somehow it always escaped me how close a connection there is between the Sermon on the Mount and John's "Bread of Life" discourse, but there it is in today's Gospel: "do not work for perishable food, but for food that remains unto life eternal, food which the Son of Man will give you..." ("Do not be anxious about food, what you are to eat or drink, or about clothing... Seek first God's kingship and righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.")

4 comments:

neuropoet3 said...

"Seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well..."
That is definitely something I needed to be reminded of this evening... we're being evicted because my husband is out of work and we can't make our rent, thankfully we have family who is going to "make room" for us - but it will be a "growing" time for everyone. I am thankful that we have family willing to help us - and I'm thankful that God is our provider...

Peace be with you,
~Jenny

Anonymous said...

Peace be with you, too, Jenny. I will add your needs to my list.

Anonymous said...

Sr. Anne, do you ever have blog respondents of Jewish faith? It occurs to me, after watching shows like Fiddler, and Barbra Streisand's Yentl, that their culture expounds a great deal on the meaningful discussion of the old Testament. Whereas, as a Catholic our tradition is of old Testament history, but the new Testament ideology...

xaipe said...

Prayers for you, Jenny, and for your children in this time of stress.

Anon, I really don't know if I have any Jewish readers; if so, I wish they would contribute to the conversation! There is a tremendous wealth in the Jewish tradition of applying the stories of Scripture to everyday life; for centuries, that was the main form of teaching the Bible, as you can see even by reading the letters of St. Paul. In fact, I don't think I would agree that our Catholic tradition is one of "Old Testament history but New Testament ideology." The Gospel certainly gives us a new perspective on the "Law, prophets and psalms," but it is consistent with them, even while revealing more about them than any human being coudld have thought possible.